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Meet a Farmer- Bill & Bev Roe, Pedro's Angus

Published Jul. 1, 2011 | Discuss this article on Facebook
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Bill & Bev Roe, Pedro's Angus

Pedroís Angus, owned by Bill and Bev Roe

Like other farmers, we are blessed to be working in a profession that brings satisfaction and joy, as well as plenty of challenges. Pedroís Angus Farmís roots started in the 1800s when Bevís great grandfather Barley Wagner raised Shorthorns near Fremont, in northern Ohio. Father Nick Wagner transitioned from Shorthorn to Hereford and finally to Angus in the 1950s, selecting moderate framed cattle, staying away from extremes.

We started our cattle operation in 1993 with six cows and a bull from the Wagner herd. Now we have 200 head of purebred Angus on 400 acres of pasture and hay in Butler County with the help of our herdsman Michael Everett.† The yearling bulls are grown on pasture conditions to keep their fertility high. Bulls and bred females are marketed to 10 states by selling direct from the farm. Our cattle marketing program evolved from selling steaks to customers at Pedroís Angus Steakhouse.† Though retired from the restaurant business, our genetics is still based on the dinner table.† In addition to measuring cattle for easy calving and growth, the yearlings are ultrasounded to collect data on marbling, rib eye muscling and fat. Gathering accurate data is an obsession at Pedroís Angus, so customers can make sound breeding decisions.

But our cattle are not just a product that we sell to make a profit. We are like so many others that just love to watch and care for critters. We believe that our cattle receive better care than many children around the world. They have clean plentiful water, and a balanced diet of grass, clover, hay and minerals. This time of year, we make sure that our cows have plenty of shade under trees. Our cattle never need to be kept in barns even in winter; because like wild animals, they have two layers of hair. The outer layer of coarse long hair sheds water and snow. The finer inner layer stays dry and insulates the cows. During the month of July, we will share how we care for our animals and our land.

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