About OFBF

Text Size - + print article

The New Year

Published Jan. 3, 2012 | Discuss this article on Facebook

Now that the storm has rushed in, Christmas and New Year has passed and the Browns and and Buckeyes have stumbled in their athletic finales, all is back to normal in northeast Ohio.

Below freezing temperatures have settled in, the rain has finally formed into snow and the winds, oh lets not forget how forceful they are!

The majority of the harvest has been completed, but there are a few fields of corn still standing, surrounded by frozen puddles and snow covered fence lines.

Despite the weather, our farming members and board members move onward - cleaning their equipment, checking their animals, spreading manure and preparing fields for the next growing season. Many people have rid their refridgerators of the holiday leftovers and have started to divulge into the canned tomatoes, beans and peaches, the frozen chicken, beef and sausage from the auction.

Membership is a cylictrical affair - although it is a year round necessity, we really focus on it during the winter months. However, it always comes back around again. A Farm Bureau membership, unlike your holiday leftovers, never goes bad. The communities your membership represents, the education you received and the money you save goes further than just our listed partners on our membership flier.

Are we always right? No we are not. We are an organization made up of friends and neighbors, businessmen and women, fathers and mothers and sons and daughters. We are human. More importantly, we are a group of individuals that you likely know and have shaken hands with; and we are united in the name of all agriculture big and small and we do the best we can to make room and to listen to every one at our table. But similarly to our families gathered around the table during the holidays, our table can be very large and host a lot of people and consequently - many opinions, ideas and experiences are shared and shouted. However, at the end of the day, what matters most is that we are there together, under the same roof, sharing the same meal.

Years from now, how we got to that table will be almost irrelevant. What will matter is that we are at the table, sharing and passing on our traditions with each other until the next year. I ask you, as a Farm Bureau member, to share your traditions with your family as we share ours. Together, we can continue to keep agriculture relevant.

Text Size - + print article