News & Events

Still great potential with drones in ag

Published Apr. 30, 2015

For all the good they do, new technologies are not without risk, Farm Bureau told regulators. Farmers and ranchers need to be able to manage these tools safely and should be assured that their farm data is secure and cannot be used unfairly against them

How big data is revolutionizing farming

Published Apr. 30, 2015

“The reason we started 640 was there was a tremendous amount of data being left out in the field,” says Rupp, who grew up on a farm in Iowa and, post-Motorola, worked on GPS systems for tractors at Moline-based Deere. “What we wanted to do was get that data up into the cloud so we can do analytics and help that farmer become a better farmer.”

Farm manager's notebook: Reasonable cash rents ahead?

Published May. 1, 2015

The big operator cash rent bump is often twice the $50 to $75 margin you referenced. These players are losing millions at current commodity price levels

Trade Agreements Still Face Hurdles

Published May. 1, 2015

“I think a lot of it depends on the President and whether or not he’s able to allay some of the fears that people have with regards to trade,” Roberts said, referring to opposition from labor unions and other groups close to Democratic members of Congress.

OFBF talks CAUV in Mansfield

Published May. 1, 2015

The value of Ohio farmland, and property tax increases on it, were discussed Thursday at the Mansfield Kiwanis Club meeting. The guest speaker was Amy Milam, Director of Legal Education for the Ohio Farm Bureau.

International trade helps Ohio and Cleveland

Published May. 1, 2015

More than one in five Ohio jobs across all sectors depends upon international trade. In fact, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Ohio's agricultural exports alone reached an estimated $4.4 billion in 2013. This boosted farm prices and income, while supporting about 33,300 jobs

Farmers looking forward to warm, dry weather

Published May. 1, 2015

Ohio Farm Bureau spokesman Seth Teter said the rainy April slowed the central Ohio farming industry a bit but should cause no major problems. “People are waiting for the ground to dry out,” he said. “Once the temperature rises, the soil will dry out fast and furious. There will be plenty time to get crops planted.”