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County Farm Bureau nets grant to help kids grow school garden

Published Mar. 23, 2011 | Discuss this article on Facebook
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Shelby County Farm Bureau received $500 to implement its school garden project.

Buckeye Farm News

The Shelby County Farm Bureau received a $500 mini-grant from the White-Reinhardt Fund For Education to help local elementary school children grow their own school garden.

The school will start a container garden to grow fruits and vegetables to have a “salad” party as the products come in season. During the growing season the students will learn about soils, agriculture, nutrition and economics. The project also will supplement their education with the donations of literature books that will relate to the products they are growing and agriculture as a whole.

The county Farm Bureau is targeting the elementary school in the system with the least amount of green space and one in which there is a great number of low income families. Most students in this area have never had a garden and the local Farm Bureau hopes to open their eyes to agriculture and the importance of good nutrition.

“By taking part in all aspects of the garden, from the sowing of the seeds to the harvest and cooking of the products, the students will be truly a part of the whole growing season. This hands-on learning will be exciting and create a natural curiosity for learning,” the county Farm Bureau said in its grant application.

The Shelby County Farm Bureau’s school garden was one of 28 grant recipients nationwide through the fund, which is a project of the American Farm Bureau Foundation.

“It is inspiring to see so many impressive and innovative agricultural literacy programs in use or being developed all over the nation. These projects help educate students about our nation’s food, fiber and renewable fuel production, in addition to encouraging inquiries about agricultural careers,” said Curtis Miller, director of education at the foundation.

ONLINE EXTRA:

Check out what's happening in your county Farm Bureau on OFBF.org's county blogs page.

 

Photo credit: Istockphoto.com

 



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