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May We Introduce…

Published Jul. 16, 2009 | Discuss this article on Facebook
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Buckeye Farm News

Jeff Mason of Henry County

Jeff Mason has been a Farm Bureau member for about seven years and farms about 1,800 acres of corn, soybeans and wheat with his father, Rex. Mason, who lives in Henry County, also is a sales representative for Pioneer Seed.

He has served on OFBF’s Young Farmer Committee, been president of Lucas County Farm Bureau and been on the county’s board of directors. He is a member of Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church in Waterville and has been active with the Ohio Soy Council and FFA.

Mason graduated from the University of Findlay with a bachelor’s degree in business management. His wife Emily is a registered nurse and just received her master’s degree as a nurse practitioner.

Mason said it would be difficult to farm in Ohio and his area without the help of Farm Bureau.

“I think we would be struggling because we’re not too far from urban sprawl. Over the last 10 to 20 years a lot of ground has been taken for houses. I think it would be harder to deal with that situation if it weren’t for Farm Bureau,” he said. “I think Farm Bureau has worked good with both sides of that situation. Farm Bureau often educates that off-the-farm person, which enables us to work better with our neighbors.”

Amanda Denes, organization director for Erie, Huron and Lorain counties

Amanda Denes has been the organization director for Erie, Huron and Lorain counties for almost two years. She grew up on a small crop and grain farm in southern Lorain County where she also raised beef cattle.

She is a 2006 graduate of Ohio State University with a bachelor’s degree in agricultural education. Previously she worked as a toddler teacher at Oberlin Early Childhood Center. She attends St. Patrick’s Church in Wellington.

Denes is the daughter of Tom and Sandy Denes and has two older brothers, T.J. and Todd. She said she enjoys working with Farm Bureau volunteers.

“You really feel like you are helping to make a positive difference to everyone who works in the field of agriculture and that makes you feel like you are a part of something great,” she said.



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