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THE MESSAGE BOARD - Agriculture Grants Available

Published Sep. 24, 2010 | Discuss this article on Facebook
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Buckeye Farm News

Agriculture Grants Available

The Ohio Farm Bureau Foundation is offering a new series of Agricultural Action and Awareness Grants for the 2010-11 program year. The competitively awarded $1,000 - $3,000 grants are earmarked to support programs and projects focusing on agricultural education as well as environmental and/or economic development. Grant application forms and proposal instructions may be downloaded here. Completed forms and proposals must be received by November 15. Participants will be selected and awards given in January 2011. Since its creation in fall 2005, the Foundation’s Agricultural Action and Awareness Grant Program has collectively awarded close to $100,000 to community action organizations, schools, producer organizations, non-profit service organizations, neighborhood groups and individuals. Grant resources have been used to enhance projects in rural, suburban and urban communities throughout Ohio.

By The Numbers: 925 million

That's the number of chronically hungry people in the world according to the United Nations. While the number is down 98 million people from 2009, the U.N. called it "unacceptably high." A child dies every six seconds from malnutritionment related problems, it said.

Worth Following

"My thoughts with all at Ohio State's ATI and OARDC in Wooster. Damage from tornado, but thankfully no serious injuries." ~ A recent tweet by Ohio State University President Gordon Gee.

Follow @presidentgee on Twitter or visit http://tinyurl.com/ofbfsocialmedia

Their Words

“Encouraging Ohio companies to sell around the world and expand their global presence should be a priority for our leaders.”  ~ Kenyon College Professor William Melick in an op-ed column in the Columbus Dispatch saying the nation’s corporate tax code limits competitiveness.   

“The debate over animal confinement, it seems to me, is fundamentally one of values, and comes at a time when public notions about animal welfare are shifting. The critics of crowded cages and small crates for pregnant sows make (disputed) points about the risk of disease and about animal health, but the core objection is the tight confinement. Either you think that chickens suffer if they don’t have room to spread and flap their wings, and you care more about this than the price of eggs, or you don’t.”  ~ New York Times reporter Erik Eckholm summarizing his thoughts after visiting large livestock farms.



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