Here are five tips for conducting open burning and avoiding trouble with the Ohio EPA:

1. Before burning, landowners need to consider whether they are located within a restricted or unrestricted area and whether their burning activity may require notification or permission from the Ohio EPA.

2. Agricultural wastes that can be burned include any wastes generated by crop, horticultural or livestock production, including woody debris or plant material, bags, cartons, and landscape wastes. In certain circumstances, farmers are required to provide notification to EPA prior to burning agricultural wastes.

3. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources has a burn ban for unincorporated areas in the months of March, April, May, October and November. During these months, any burning must take place in a plowed garden or field and at least 200 feet from any woodland, brush or fields of dry grass.

4. Burning land clearing waste requires written permission from the EPA. Land clearing waste is plant waste generated when land is cleared for residential, commercial, industrial or agricultural development.

5. Local fire districts or jurisdictions may have their own open burning ordinances. Always check with your local fire department, and make them aware of your activity to prevent confusion and unnecessary alarm to your local first responders.

More Landowner Information

For further explanation of these tips and other information on other topics impacting landowners, Ohio Farm Bureau members can log in and download the Landowner Toolkit. Not a member? Join today!

Get the full list of landowner topics covered in the toolkit, with tips blogs for each in Ohio Farm Bureau’s Legal Information Series.

Also, listen to Legal with Leah, a podcast featuring Ohio Farm Bureau’s Director of Ag Law Leah Curtis discussing topics impacting landowners.

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Having opportunities to attend leadership institutes, advocate for rural Ohioans on the state and national level, facilitate young ag professionals events, and serve in a variety of leadership positions have helped my skills grow exponentially.
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Sara Tallmadge

Ashland County Farm Bureau

Growing our Generation
Labor has always been an issue, mainly because we are a seasonal operation. So that's a challenge finding somebody who only wants to work three months out of a year, sometimes up to six months.
Mandy Way's avatar
Mandy Way

Way Farms

Business Solutions
If it wasn't for Farm Bureau, I personally, along with many others, would not have had the opportunity to meet with our representatives face to face in Washington.
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Austin Heil

Hardin County Farm Bureau

Washington, D.C. Leadership Experience
I was gifted the great opportunity through an Ohio Farm Bureau Foundation Youth Pathways grant to run a series of summer camps here. That really expanded my vision of what ‘grow, maintain, sustain and explain’ could actually be.
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Jim Bruner

Mezzacello Urban Farms

Farming for Good
I see the value and need to be engaged in the community I live in, to be a part of the decision-making process and to volunteer with organizations that help make our community better.
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Matt Aultman

Darke County Farm Bureau

Leadership development
So many of the issues that OFBF and its members are advocating for are important to all Ohioans. I look at OFBF as an agricultural watchdog advocating for farmers and rural communities across Ohio.
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Mary Smallsreed

Trumbull County Farm Bureau

Advocacy
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