CAUV reappraisal counties

24 counties to see lower CAUV values, taxes

There is good news for the 24 Ohio counties that are up for reappraisal this year for their Current Agricultural Use Value (CAUV). Landowners in these counties will see an average 30 percent decrease in their farmland values and similar decreases in their taxes. These significant savings are a result of Ohio Farm Bureau’s diligent work in getting the state legislature to enact changes last year in CAUV, which taxes farmland for its agricultural value rather than its fair market value. These savings are particularly important as values of homes have gone up with the recovery in the housing market.

“This was a huge win for members and came about because of the grassroots efforts of our members across the state who took the time to talk to legislators about how important CAUV was to them and the impact of the very high CAUV values on their farms,” said Leah Curtis, OFBF’s policy counsel.

Counties have their CAUV values reappraised/updated every three years in a schedule set up in the 1970s. In January, landowners in the 24 counties will receive their tax bill with the new CAUV value, resulting in potentially significant savings in their taxes. Next year, 23 counties are up for reappraisal.

One area of CAUV reform that Ohio Farm Bureau pushed hard for deals with land used for a conservation practice or enrolled in a federal conservation program. Under CAUV reform, conservation lands are valued at the minimum CAUV value of $230 per acre. Curtis noted that landowners must provide additional information to their auditor to receive the lower conservation value.

“That can be a significant savings if you have a high value soil with a conservation practice on it, but your auditor can’t do it unless you let them know it’s there,”
she said.

For more information about CAUV reform, including details about how to document conservation land for auditors, visit the CAUV resource page.

Ohio Farm Bureau membership

Amy Graves 

Amy Graves is a freelance writer from Franklin County.