Dog

Here are five tips regarding Ohio’s dog laws for landowners:

1) All dogs over three months of age must be registered annually. Dog owners should ensure all dogs not confined to a kennel are displaying their registration tag on the collar at all times.

2) Unless engaged in the act of hunting with an owner, dogs should always be confined to the owner’s property or under the control of their owner. Failing to keep a dog confined or under reasonable control could subject the owner to a fine.

3) Ohio has recently updated dog categories to nuisance, dangerous, and vicious dogs. If a dog is determined to fit one of these categories by a proper official, a dog owner will have more responsibilities as to their dog, including confinement and insurance requirements.

4) Landowners have the right to protect their livestock whenever a dog is in the act of chasing, threatening, harassing, or injuring livestock on the landowner’s property. Landowners will not be held criminally liable for injuring or harming a dog that is in the act of harming livestock.

5) The Dog and Kennel Fund, funded by a portion of dog registration fees, may in some cases provide fair market compensation when livestock are killed or injured by trespassing dogs.

More Ohio landowner information

For further explanation of these tips and other information on other topics impacting landowners, Ohio Farm Bureau members can log in and download the Landowner Toolkit. Not a member? Join today!

Also, listen to Legal with Leah, a podcast discussing topics impacting landowners.

 

I'm eternally grateful for the support Ohio Farm Bureau scholarships provided in helping me turn my dreams into reality.
Bethany Starlin's avatar
Bethany Starlin

Hocking County Farm Bureau

Available scholarships
I see the value and need to be engaged in the community I live in, to be a part of the decision-making process and to volunteer with organizations that help make our community better.
Matt Aultman's avatar
Matt Aultman

Darke County Farm Bureau

Leadership development
With not growing up on a farm, I’d say I was a late bloomer to agriculture. I feel so fortunate that I found the agriculture industry. There are so many opportunities for growth.
Jenna Gregorich's avatar
Jenna Gregorich

Coshocton County Farm Bureau

Growing our Generation
Labor has always been an issue, mainly because we are a seasonal operation. So that's a challenge finding somebody who only wants to work three months out of a year, sometimes up to six months.
Mandy Way's avatar
Mandy Way

Way Farms

Business Solutions
Farm Bureau involvement has taught me how to grow my professional and leadership experience outside of the workforce and how to do that in a community-centric way.
Jaclyn De Candio's avatar
Jaclyn De Candio

Clark County Farm Bureau

Young Ag Professionals program
If it wasn't for Farm Bureau, I personally, along with many others, would not have had the opportunity to meet with our representatives face to face in Washington.
Austin Heil's avatar
Austin Heil

Hardin County Farm Bureau

Washington, D.C. Leadership Experience
So many of the issues that OFBF and its members are advocating for are important to all Ohioans. I look at OFBF as an agricultural watchdog advocating for farmers and rural communities across Ohio.
Mary Smallsreed's avatar
Mary Smallsreed

Trumbull County Farm Bureau

Advocacy
Suggested Tags: