A buzz of activity surrounds the lead-up to Memorial Day for nurseries and greenhouses, like bees hovering around the bright blooms that are sold all across the county that weekend.

Tammy Faykosh, Head Gardener, Wolf's Blooms Berries photographed Thursday, May 25, 2017 in Bowling Green, Ohio works on organizing some Memorial Day arrangements at the greenhouse. (© James D. DeCamp | http://JamesDeCamp.com | 614-367-6366)

Wolf’s Blooms and Berries in northwest Ohio is no exception, as staff runs from one retail display to another, watering plants and snapping off wilted leaves.

Wood County Farm Bureau members James and Sue Wolf have operated the greenhouse in Bowling Green for more than 20 years. After two decades, they have a good sense of what their customers want. On Memorial Day the graves of loved ones who have passed are adorned in remembrance, especially those of service men and women to commemorate their service and sacrifice.

“We have many customers with a priority to make sure their loved ones’ graves are tended to and decorated for Memorial Day events, “ Sue said. “Customers are also eager to start their outside summer entertainment on Memorial Day and their yards and patios are a priority to plant and decorate.”

Kim Ringler, Plant Production, Wolf's Blooms Berries photographed Thursday, May 25, 2017 in Bowling Green, Ohio works on organizing some Memorial Day arrangements at the greenhouse. (© James D. DeCamp | http://JamesDeCamp.com | 614-367-6366)
Kim Ringler, plant production, organizes Memorial Day arrangements.

It’s good to keep in mind that Memorial Day weekend is in some ways a grand finale of the flower season. In another month the Wolf’s greenhouse turns from blooms to berries.

“We start harvesting strawberries around the first week in June,” Sue said. “Our goal is to have our greenhouse emptied out by the time berries are done, which is (usually) around the end of June.”

Feature Image: Sue Wolf, owner of Wolf’s Blooms and Berries works on organizing some Memorial Day arrangements at the greenhouse.

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Hocking County Farm Bureau

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