Supply Chain Disruption

The Ohio Farm Bureau Federation has released early results of a new survey finding that 65% of those involved in Ohio’s food supply system have been negatively or very negatively impacted by the global COVID-19 pandemic.

The statewide Farm, Food and Agribusiness COVID-19 Impact Survey, distributed by Ohio Farm Bureau and a number of other agriculture groups, collected data to pinpoint areas of concern for every aspect of agriculture, including producers, retailers and food processors. With over 1,000 surveys returned, statistics show:

  • Nearly half (45%) of respondents have had their market distribution channels disrupted.
  • 29% of those taking part in the survey have cash flow issues.
  • Almost 15% of people polled cannot access the sanitation and protective equipment items required to operate (masks, sanitizer, etc.)

“This is a real-time snapshot of what the state’s agriculture community is dealing with as we work through the challenges of the coronavirus outbreak,” said Adam Sharp, executive vice president of Ohio Farm Bureau. “Even though everyone along the food supply chain is essential and the work continues from the farm to the grocery store, there is still more work to do to make sure we keep the system moving in the right direction.”

From the onset of the pandemic, Farm Bureau has been delivering the most up-to-date information from the state and national levels to help its members navigate through these challenging times. This survey will help further those efforts.

“The information we are receiving from this survey is going to help us on two fronts,” said Yvonne Lesicko, vice president of public policy for Ohio Farm Bureau. “We are lobbying hard to make sure USDA is allocating funds where they are needed the most across the industry, and we are trying to find solutions where we can for market disruptions.”

Complete results of the survey will also be shared across Ohio’s food sector to allow commodity groups and organizations to work with their members directly to discuss the challenges being seen in their part of the industry due to COVID-19.

 

This is a news release for use by journalists. Questions should be directed to Ty Higgins, 614-246-8231 or [email protected].

I'm eternally grateful for the support Ohio Farm Bureau scholarships provided in helping me turn my dreams into reality.
Bethany Starlin's avatar
Bethany Starlin

Hocking County Farm Bureau

Available scholarships
I see the value and need to be engaged in the community I live in, to be a part of the decision-making process and to volunteer with organizations that help make our community better.
Matt Aultman's avatar
Matt Aultman

Darke County Farm Bureau

Leadership development
With not growing up on a farm, I’d say I was a late bloomer to agriculture. I feel so fortunate that I found the agriculture industry. There are so many opportunities for growth.
Jenna Gregorich's avatar
Jenna Gregorich

Coshocton County Farm Bureau

Growing our Generation
Labor has always been an issue, mainly because we are a seasonal operation. So that's a challenge finding somebody who only wants to work three months out of a year, sometimes up to six months.
Mandy Way's avatar
Mandy Way

Way Farms

Business Solutions
Farm Bureau involvement has taught me how to grow my professional and leadership experience outside of the workforce and how to do that in a community-centric way.
Jaclyn De Candio's avatar
Jaclyn De Candio

Clark County Farm Bureau

Young Ag Professionals program
If it wasn't for Farm Bureau, I personally, along with many others, would not have had the opportunity to meet with our representatives face to face in Washington.
Austin Heil's avatar
Austin Heil

Hardin County Farm Bureau

Washington, D.C. Leadership Experience
So many of the issues that OFBF and its members are advocating for are important to all Ohioans. I look at OFBF as an agricultural watchdog advocating for farmers and rural communities across Ohio.
Mary Smallsreed's avatar
Mary Smallsreed

Trumbull County Farm Bureau

Advocacy
Suggested Tags: