Adding agritourism to farm or ranch

The following information is provided by Nationwide, the No.1 farm and ranch insurer in the U.S.*

Agritourism is a great way to capitalize on the natural draw of your landscape, connect nonfarm families to agriculture and create new revenue streams for your operation. But these benefits are not without risk.

Finding the right agritourism for an operation

Adding a new agritourism venture to your operation starts by answering a simple question: What will work best? Consider the following:

  • Your land, what you raise and any other resources that could contribute to a new attraction.
  • The time and money you can invest in an agritourism venture.
  • Potential hazards to visitors, the liability they create for you and how you’ll mitigate the risks and keep people safe.

“It doesn’t always have to be a large venture that requires a lot of resources,” said Barb Neal, Cornell Cooperative Extension agriculture agent and horticulture educator in Tioga County, New York. “Everybody has a specialty, so it’s just a matter of finding what will require the right amount of time and investment.”

Agritourism examples to consider

Pumpkin patches and corn mazes. Fairly common around the country, they’re popular but can require a lot of time and labor.

  • Farm tours and hay rides. Also fairly common, opening your farm to the public for tours and offering services like hay rides provide up-close farm experiences. They often vary widely on cost, supervision and risk exposure.
  • Bed & breakfasts. An unoccupied farm house or even a repurposed barn or other farm building offer farm guests distinctive overnight stays. Time and labor required are normally fairly high.
  • Experiences. Ranging from “U-Pick” farms and Christmas tree farms to barn rentals for events like weddings, these also can range widely in cost, supervision and risk exposure.
  • Classes. Weekly or monthly classes on things like jam- or bread-making can be an easy, low-cost option.
Minimizing the risks of agritourism

Before adding agritourism to your farm or ranch, think about the specific risks you and your visitors will face and how you’ll mitigate them. This includes simple things like trip and fall hazards all the way to specific risks around livestock, farm equipment and food safety. Conduct a thorough audit of these types of risks and start by taking steps to minimize the hazards they represent.

“Check with your state for any agritourism protective measures and talk to your insurance agent for guidance on mitigation measures and how you can expand your insurance coverage,” said Neal.

Talk with your insurance agent

Farmers who offer agritourism activities need to discuss their specific types of businesses with their insurance agent. Usually, the policy that provides liability for the farm business does not extend to liability from other profit-making activities, such as agritourism.

Your local Nationwide Farm Certified agent can help you identify risks, implement safe practices and confirm you have the right agritourism insurance in place. Nationwide offers liability coverages that can be written as a package, in conjunction with a farm policy, to cover your agritourism ventures.

Visit AgInsightCenter.com to see the latest articles, videos and podcasts. While you’re there, sign up to receive our bimonthly AIC email newsletter.

*A.M. Best Market Share Report 2021. Nationwide, the Nationwide N and Eagle, and Nationwide is on your side are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. © 2022 Nationwide.
I'm eternally grateful for the support Ohio Farm Bureau scholarships provided in helping me turn my dreams into reality.
Bethany Starlin's avatar
Bethany Starlin

Hocking County Farm Bureau

Available scholarships
I see the value and need to be engaged in the community I live in, to be a part of the decision-making process and to volunteer with organizations that help make our community better.
Matt Aultman's avatar
Matt Aultman

Darke County Farm Bureau

Leadership development
With not growing up on a farm, I’d say I was a late bloomer to agriculture. I feel so fortunate that I found the agriculture industry. There are so many opportunities for growth.
Jenna Gregorich's avatar
Jenna Gregorich

Coshocton County Farm Bureau

Growing our Generation
Labor has always been an issue, mainly because we are a seasonal operation. So that's a challenge finding somebody who only wants to work three months out of a year, sometimes up to six months.
Mandy Way's avatar
Mandy Way

Way Farms

Business Solutions
Farm Bureau involvement has taught me how to grow my professional and leadership experience outside of the workforce and how to do that in a community-centric way.
Jaclyn De Candio's avatar
Jaclyn De Candio

Clark County Farm Bureau

Young Ag Professionals program
If it wasn't for Farm Bureau, I personally, along with many others, would not have had the opportunity to meet with our representatives face to face in Washington.
Austin Heil's avatar
Austin Heil

Hardin County Farm Bureau

Washington, D.C. Leadership Experience
So many of the issues that OFBF and its members are advocating for are important to all Ohioans. I look at OFBF as an agricultural watchdog advocating for farmers and rural communities across Ohio.
Mary Smallsreed's avatar
Mary Smallsreed

Trumbull County Farm Bureau

Advocacy
Suggested Tags: