2020 Youth Capital Challenge

Public policy, fellowship and interaction with state representatives were all part of the opening session for 2020 Ohio Youth Capital Challenge participants.

A total of 36 students ages 14-18 and 10 mentors gathered March 3 in Columbus to discuss agricultural issues and policy as part of the annual program, which is a collaboration among Ohio Farm Bureau, Ohio FFA and Ohio State University Extension. The interactive education program engages youths in the civic life of their community. The students team up in groups to identify issues and problems facing their community. After researching a specific topic, they develop a public policy plan to propose to appropriate government leaders.

Kelsey Turner, Ohio Farm Bureau program specialist, leadership development, said the initial policy proposals ranged from re-evaluating school lunch programs and requiring mental health first aid classes in high schools to using 4-H and FFA as a part of re-entry programs for troubled youths.

“After spending a full day with this year’s Youth Capital Challenge participants, I am beyond impressed with the initial ideas proposed,” Turner said. “These students are passionate about tackling tough issues through public policy that will result in a better and stronger community.”

The next step of the challenge is for the youths to work with team members and mentors on their issue. May 16, each of the 10 groups will present its policy proposal, with four chosen to compete in the finals during the 2020 Ohio State Fair.

 

This is a news release for use by journalists. Questions should be directed to Ty Higgins, 614-246-8231.

Editors: A high-resolution photo is available to accompany this story.

 

I'm eternally grateful for the support Ohio Farm Bureau scholarships provided in helping me turn my dreams into reality.
Bethany Starlin's avatar
Bethany Starlin

Hocking County Farm Bureau

Available scholarships
I see the value and need to be engaged in the community I live in, to be a part of the decision-making process and to volunteer with organizations that help make our community better.
Matt Aultman's avatar
Matt Aultman

Darke County Farm Bureau

Leadership development
With not growing up on a farm, I’d say I was a late bloomer to agriculture. I feel so fortunate that I found the agriculture industry. There are so many opportunities for growth.
Jenna Gregorich's avatar
Jenna Gregorich

Coshocton County Farm Bureau

Growing our Generation
Labor has always been an issue, mainly because we are a seasonal operation. So that's a challenge finding somebody who only wants to work three months out of a year, sometimes up to six months.
Mandy Way's avatar
Mandy Way

Way Farms

Business Solutions
Farm Bureau involvement has taught me how to grow my professional and leadership experience outside of the workforce and how to do that in a community-centric way.
Jaclyn De Candio's avatar
Jaclyn De Candio

Clark County Farm Bureau

Young Ag Professionals program
If it wasn't for Farm Bureau, I personally, along with many others, would not have had the opportunity to meet with our representatives face to face in Washington.
Austin Heil's avatar
Austin Heil

Hardin County Farm Bureau

Washington, D.C. Leadership Experience
So many of the issues that OFBF and its members are advocating for are important to all Ohioans. I look at OFBF as an agricultural watchdog advocating for farmers and rural communities across Ohio.
Mary Smallsreed's avatar
Mary Smallsreed

Trumbull County Farm Bureau

Advocacy
Suggested Tags: